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Announcing the 6th Surrogacy for Gay Men Forum in Melbourne – Saturday 5th November 11am to 2pm

September 13, 2011 Leave a comment

Gay Dads Australia is pleased to announce that we will be holding the 6th Surrogacy for Gay Men Forum in Melbourne onSaturday 5th November 2011 from 11am to 2pm.
We are pleased to be able to hold this important forum at the JOY 94.9 function room in Melbourne’s CBD.  JOY 94.9 is Melbourne’s Gay and Lesbian Radio Station and is an amazing supporter of gay dads and rainbow families. We are thrilled that they are supporting us in holding this forum.  Please support them.
We will be announcing full program and registration details shortly but if you are interested in finding out more about becoming a dad via surrogacy then please mark this in your diary.  We will have some great speakers to help you learn about surrogacy in general, surrogacy in Victoria, surrogacy in USA and surrogacy in India.  Light refreshments will be provided.  The forum is more than just a chance to learn about surrogacy, it is also an opportunity to meet and network with guys going through the process as well.
The forum as always will be FREE and put on entirely by volunteers.  
Last year we got around 90 guys coming along to the forum (some are now dads!!!) and we expect that there will be a similar demand for the forum this year.  When registrations open it is important to register early to ensure a place as numbers are limited by the size of the venue.  We will certainly try to accomodate everyone we can.
You can email me directly on rodneycruise@gmail.com to indicate your desire to attend however we will open formal registration later in the week.
Every years we get guys from around the country (and from outside Australia) flying in for the forum and we certainly encourage guys interstate to come if they can.  
A big thank you goes to Adrian Perillo and JOY 94.9 for their amazing support to help us put on this forum.
Further details and registration forms will be posted on this website within the next week.

Categories: Uncategorized

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January 1, 2011 Leave a comment

Jason Tuazon-McCheyne, who is one of the best known Surro-Dads in Australia, has just had his paper “Two Dads: Gay Male Parenting and its Politicisation — A Cooperative Inquiry Action Research Study” published in the  Australian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy (ANZJFT).  The abstract follows and a copy of the paper is attached.  This is a very interesting read and represents one of the very few pieces of academic studies done in Australia in to gay male parents (via surrogacy).  Well done Jason, I know what an amazing amount of work went into this paper.

Australian gay men have only recently become parents through surrogacy arrangements. They have had to overcome a discriminatory legal, social, political, cultural and financial environment. A cooperative inquiry action research group was formed, with seven two-father families conceived via surrogacy, to explore their journey to parenthood and their consequent politicisation as gay fathers. This article reveals how that experience of the cooperative inquiry process strengthened their resolve to be intentionally ‘out’ in their communities to overcome discriminatory and conservative social attitudes. They embraced the political reality of their parenting and were stimulated to create improved support structures for themselves and future parents. This transformed the legal, social, political and cultural environment for their families.

[SourceTwo Dads: Gay Male Parenting and its Politicisation — A Cooperative Inquiry Action Research Study – By Jason Tuazon-McCheyne]

Download Paper

Categories: Uncategorized

[?Australia] – Two Dads: Gay Male Parenting and its Politicisation — A Cooperative Inquiry Action Research Study – by Jason Tuazon-McCheyne – Volume 31 Issue 4

December 31, 2010 Leave a comment

Jason Tuazon-McCheyne, who is one of the best known Surro-Dads in Australia, has just had his paper “Two Dads: Gay Male Parenting and its Politicisation — A Cooperative Inquiry Action Research Study” published in the  Australian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy (ANZJFT).  The abstract follows and a copy of the paper is attached.  This is a very interesting read and represents one of the very few pieces of academic studies done in Australia in to gay male parents (via surrogacy).  Well done Jason, I know what an amazing amount of work went into this paper.

Australian gay men have only recently become parents through surrogacy arrangements. They have had to overcome a discriminatory legal, social, political, cultural and financial environment. A cooperative inquiry action research group was formed, with seven two-father families conceived via surrogacy, to explore their journey to parenthood and their consequent politicisation as gay fathers. This article reveals how that experience of the cooperative inquiry process strengthened their resolve to be intentionally ‘out’ in their communities to overcome discriminatory and conservative social attitudes. They embraced the political reality of their parenting and were stimulated to create improved support structures for themselves and future parents. This transformed the legal, social, political and cultural environment for their families.

[Source: Original Paper]

Download now or preview on posterous

TwoDads-McCheyne.pdf (101 KB)

Categories: Uncategorized

[Australia] – Organising Work and Home in Same-Sex Parented Families: Findings From the Work Love Play Study – THE AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF FAMILY THERAPY – Volume 31 Number 4 2010 pp. 374–391

December 31, 2010 Leave a comment

The full report on “Organising Work and Home in Same-Sex Parented Families: Findings From the Work Love Play Study” has been published: 

In this article we present findings from the Work, Love and Play (WLP) study: a survey completed by 445 same-sex attracted parents across Australia and New Zealand. Comparisons of household division of labour are made between a sub-sample of WLP participants, who were currently cohabiting with a same-sex partner (n = 317), and 958 cohabiting opposite-sex parents surveyed as part of a major Australian study, Negotiating the Life Course. This comparison showed that same-sex couples divided household labour significantly more equally than heterosexual parents, and lesbian couples also shared parenting tasks more equally. Qualitative findings from the WLP study indicate that, for many same-sex couples, major decisions around who gives up paid work and how many hours parents choose to work, as well as decisions around work/family balance, are negotiated on the basis of couple’s preferences and circumstance rather than an assump- tion that one parent will be the primary child carer. It is speculated that this finding highlights an important point of difference between same-sex couples and heterosexual couples where the division of household labour is often based on the assumption that the mother will almost always be the primary child carer and homemaker. The research is a collaborative partnership between La Trobe University, Deakin University, The University of Melbourne, and Relationships Australia Victoria.

[Source: Original Paper]

 

Categories: Uncategorized

[Australia] – Sydney Morning Herald – “Gay parents are more equal than others” by Adele Horin

December 29, 2010 Leave a comment

ALISON RUTHERFORD is a little surprised that so many women she meets complain about their husbands’ ineptness around the house.

It is not a problem she experiences with her same-sex partner, Dale Newman, who is the co-parent of three-year-old Rafael.

”There’s a female culture of husband bashing which is quite alien to me,” she said.

Same-sex parents, research shows, are significantly more egalitarian than heterosexual parents in the way they divide household tasks and parenting responsibilities.

With lesbian couples, the mother who carries the baby and breastfeeds it is not assumed to be the parent who will stay at home or be the main nurturer. In fact little can be assumed and everything must be negotiated when couples do not have gender roles to fall back on.

The findings, from the Work, Love and Play study which compared the experience of

317 same-sex parents – including 27 men – and 958 heterosexual parents, challenges the notion that biology is destiny.

”It is not uncommon for the biological capacity of mothers – childbearing, breastfeeding, nurturing – to be used as the rationale for women’s more limited participation in the workforce and their primary role as homemaker,” says Jennifer Power, of

La Trobe University, a co-author. But among lesbian couples, generally both women take on a mothering role, regardless of who gave birth, and both tend to take on the work role. In other cases, the women changed roles over time.

The study found that compared with heterosexual parents, both same-sex parents are much more likely to be working part time. Only 6 per cent of Australian couples with children under the age of 15 have neither parent working full time, compared with 23 per cent of lesbian couples.

Perhaps because of the extraordinary effort gay people must go to to have children, spending time with them is a big priority for both parents, the study found.

As a result, both partners tend to take responsibility for generating income and for all household tasks. ”Sharing roles means each partner develops empathy for what the other is doing,” said the study, published in The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy.

Dr Rutherford, 41, from the school of public health and community medicine at the University of NSW, and Ms Newman, 47, a freelance illustrator, have been together 11 years. The planning and making of Rafael took four years, Ms Newman said.

Though Dr Rutherford was the main breadwinner, she was the more determined to have children and is Rafael’s biological mother.

She took six months’ maternity leave before returning to work three days a week. Then Ms Newman, who works from home, did more of the parenting.

The decision to live on two part-time incomes until Rafael started school was fairly easy. ”We’re older parents, we’ll only have one child, and five years is not a huge chunk of our lives,” Dr Rutherford said.

While their closest friends are a heterosexual couple both of whom work part time, most parents of preschoolers they encounter are in more traditional relationships where women complain that their husbands do not do enough housework.

”I get jealous that the women don’t have to be breadwinners as well as mothers, so there’s always something to complain about,” Dr Rutherford said.

[Source: Original Article]

 

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[Israel] The Jerusalum Post – “Legal ruling will allow gay men to adopt partner’s child” by Ruth Eglash

December 20, 2010 Leave a comment

 

Irit Rosenblum

“This is a big step for the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community in Israel,” commented lawyer Irit Rosenblum.

A breakthrough legal ruling in the Jerusalem Family Court on Thursday will pave the way for homosexuals to officially adopt their partner’s or spouse’s child, the Tel Aviv-based New Family organization told The Jerusalem Post on Sunday.

“This is a big step for the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community in Israel,” commented lawyer Irit Rosenblum, executive director of New Family, an organization that champions the rights of Israelis to marry and build families outside the traditional system.

“However, there is still a long road to the desired recognition, since each issue pertaining to gay rights is decided by the courts, and not by the legislature.”

Rosenblum, who submitted the request for adoption on behalf of the couple, told the Post that before this particular petition, no male homosexual had applied to legally adopt his partner’s child.

She pointed out that unlike in the past, surrogacy has succeeded in creating a new situation for gay couples, in which a man can become a single parent.

In this precedent-setting case, the child in question was born two years go to a man via a surrogate mother in India.

About a year ago, the father asked to allow his partner to adopt the child.

The two men went through the standard adoption process – including a review from a social worker, who assessed the partner to be a fit parent and submitted a positive recommendation to the Jerusalem Family Court.

Read more…

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December 18, 2010 Leave a comment
Categories: Uncategorized